How To Avoid People Saying What Not To Say To People With Depression

Articles on what not to say to people suffering from depression abound online, and are fairly helpful. (Here’s an example.)

I usually agree with most, if not all points, having both suffered from depression myself, and having had people who cared, but who were wholly unqualified to weigh in, trying to offer helpful advice. Continue reading


Suffer The Little Homophobes


Photo credit: YouTube

The scene: a pre-Christmas dinner date, in a pleasant, local restaurant. The dramatis personae: Adam Fannin, pastor at the Stedfast Baptist Church in Jacksonville, Florida; his wife; and the waiting staff at said restaurant. In later remarks to his congregation, he bewails his evening, ruined on account of having to be served by waiters whom he presumes to be gay.

Here comes this flaming foo-foo fruit loop. I’m here to have date night, enjoy some time with my wife, and I can’t because of the lisps.

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Truth, Trauma, and Imagined Responses

In the tradition of the esprit d’escalier – the French term for thinking of one’s ideal response to a question only once one has left the party and is already down the stairs. Although in this case, the staircase is more like a hamster wheel, as I am asked the same question repeatedly.

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The Roots of Narcissism | Psychology Today

It’s a constructive exercise to encourage discussion on this, and to allay misconceptions due to NPD apparently being social media’s darling disorder, but I somewhat disagree with this interpretation from author and clinical psychologist, Dr. Seth Meyers. As he establishes early on, the narcissistic personality certainly doesn’t stem from a sense of superiority; that’s just how this maladaptive behaviour presents itself. Continue reading

Trump’s rhetoric: a triumph of inarticulacy

An interesting look here from the UK’s The Guardian newspaper at President-elect Donald Trump’s use of language*, and what it can tell us. I’m reminded of Austrian writer Karl Kraus’s observation that:

The secret of the demagogue is to make himself as stupid as his audience so that they believe they are as clever as he.

The author of the article, Sam Leith, tells us that reading-level algorithms “found [Trump’s] speeches pitched at fourth-grade level, i.e. the comprehension of an average nine-year old”. By sheer coincidence, just before last Christmas and while browsing laboriously through my Sina Weibo feed (China’s answer to Twitter), I came across the following Weibo tweet:


which translates, roughly (and witheringly), as “One of the reasons why I like Trump is that I can understand his tweets with my fourth-grade English”.


*And an equally interesting article, published today, on Trump’s facial expressions and what they indicate, by psychologist Peter Collett.


“His spelling and grammar are disastrous, he contradicts himself, trails into incoherence, never sounds dignified or recognisably presidential – but none of it does him any harm. In fact…”

Source: Trump’s rhetoric: a triumph of inarticulacy