What Does ‘Cultural Appropriation’ Mean? – The Atlantic

Probably the most articulate, most cogent commentary/exchange I have seen or heard yet, on the subject of cultural appropriation.

It’s a fairly lengthy interview, but well worth it, for the balanced, nuanced, and analytical approach taken by both participants.

“These aren’t genetic issues, they’re cultural issues, so I don’t feel ashamed for any of it,” he said. “I wasn’t there. You weren’t either. And we’re all obligated to use our talents for the good of others, whether our great-grandfather was a Russian immigrant, a slave, or a Southern plantation owner with 5,000 slaves.”

~Richard Rabinowitz, curator at the New-York Historical Society


Source: What Does Cultural Appropriation Mean?

The Roots of Narcissism | Psychology Today

It’s a constructive exercise to encourage discussion on this, and to allay misconceptions due to NPD apparently being social media’s darling disorder, but I somewhat disagree with this interpretation from author and clinical psychologist, Dr. Seth Meyers. As he establishes early on, the narcissistic personality certainly doesn’t stem from a sense of superiority; that’s just how this maladaptive behaviour presents itself. Continue reading

The Persistent Pain of Family Estrangement

 

The subject article that appeared in the online edition of Psychology Today really resonated with me, so if you’ve been following any of my blog posts at all, you can probably empathise with the almost desperate alacrity with which I jumped at the chance to write a bit about something other than farcically dysfunctional politicking (#ThanksObama). The added bonus, of course, was that so (too) many people come from similarly unpleasant backgrounds, so in addition to the evident cathartic aspect, the simple fact of sharing one’s experiences and insights can at the very least foster a sense of solidarity, and at best, help someone else gain a different perspective, and perhaps even some food for thought or techniques for self-help. Continue reading

The Muzzling of Satire?

It was Australian actor, author, and comedian extraordinaire, Barry Humphries (whose gifts to the world include the larger-than-life Dame Edna Everage, among others), who made the following pithy observation:

It is this shared sentiment – one of despair at the misapprehension of satire, its importance in calling out demagoguery and ills in general, and the ever-present possibility of its erosion in the face of popular obtuseness – that got me in a bit of a rage this week, on discovering the palliative efforts of an American academic in combatting public credulity. Relevant, particularly, in the wake of the muck-fest of misinformation that was the 2016 US presidential race. Continue reading